Patently Apple has been scouring through Apple’s designs and has stumbled across a patent that claims to reveal the real future of Siri, and how it’s set to become a much cleverer, bigger part of your life. The scary bit? Apple wants to let Siri to buy things for you.

The patent describes a complex and all-pervasive future for the humble voice assistant, with Siri making its way into your computer, TV and even car. The in-depth look at Apple’s patents reveals that Siri will soon be able to order you things from online websites.

It’ll also be able to initiate conversation, rather than waiting for you to ask it something. On top of all that, Siri will be your future user manual. “Apple’s patent shows us that Siri will be able to be configured to work with various new scenarios and even act as an instructor when we purchase future devices.”

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The report continues: “Siri will simply teach us what we’ll want to know about our new devices when we’re ready to ask it a question about a new function or feature.”

We all knew that the current implementation of Siri is mere proof of concept compared to what apple has planned for the future, but if the patents are to be believed then Siri could end up being the bedrock of all Apple products, rather than the novelty it currently is.

Want a more in-depth read? Check out Patently Apple’s full patent teardown.

  • Nixon

    I don’t see how letting Siri buy things for me is scary. More like freaking awesome and incredibly helpful.

  • Anonymous

    You conclude with “Want a big, complicated read?” You read it and thought it was good enough to write a report about it. The first half of the original patent report is broken down for any consumer to be able to understand and even get to see information you didn’t include. Some of the engineering stuff will be appreciated by those working in the tech sector who understand the principles. But consumers could just skim over that. The point being that you shouldn’t discourage your fan base from reading a full report and more facts. It was an unnecessary line in a decent report. Thanks.

    • Anonymous

      You’re right: ‘Complicated’ was perhaps the wrong wording. I’ve amended it, as the chaps at Patently Apple deserve more kudos.

  • Anonymous

    You conclude with “Want a big, complicated read?” You read it and thought it was good enough to write a report about it. The first half of the original patent report is broken down for any consumer to be able to understand and even get to see information you didn’t include. Some of the engineering stuff will be appreciated by those working in the tech sector who understand the principles. But consumers could just skim over that. The point being that you shouldn’t discourage your fan base from reading a full report and more facts. It was an unnecessary line in a decent report. Thanks.

  • Anonymous

    You conclude with “Want a big, complicated read?” You read it and thought it was good enough to write a report about it. The first half of the original patent report is broken down for any consumer to be able to understand and even get to see information you didn’t include. Some of the engineering stuff will be appreciated by those working in the tech sector who understand the principles. But consumers could just skim over that. The point being that you shouldn’t discourage your fan base from reading a full report and more facts. It was an unnecessary line in a decent report. Thanks.

  • BDubs

    I think Siri is the most over-rated waste of time since the mini-disc. Being in England, I can’t even get it to give me a straight answer when asked “Is there a post office near?

    The reply is usually around the same “Im sorry, I can only look for Business’ in the US, and when you are using US english”

    The novelty wore off after I repeatedly asked it how much it would charge for a blow job. 

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