Dyson Air Multiplier review Dyson Air Multiplier review

ratingratingratingratingrating
Categories: Gadgets Reviews   Tags: ,
We love
Loopy looks and innovative innards
We hate
High price tag will put some people off, and that’s a shame
Verdict
It doesn’t do anything new, but what it does do is a whole lot better
Launch Price
£200
6 Pages
123456

Dyson Air Multiplier

Dyson’s new desktop fan is an oddball. Part sculpture, part next-gen wind generator it’s as far removed from the typical design of a desktop fan as the first iPod was from the MP3 players it kicked into touch, and that’s the point. Yes it looks different, but it works differently too. This is a game-changer for the permanently perspiring, a shot in the arm for stuffy offices, and a godsend for dust-phobic windseekers. Read our full Dyson Air Multiplier review for all the details.

Dyson’s been experimenting with wind since its first vacuum cleaner hit the upholstery. And the shagpile. And the lino. In that time it’s learnt more about dust dynamics and air movement than most companies know about their profit margins, and the Air Multiplier represents the culmination of its research.

See, the Air Multiplier is designed to take a relatively small gust of wind and turn it into a roaring gale. It uses a system dubbed inducement to create a low pressure zone in the middle of its ring (stop sniggering at the back) which draws air from behind, and pushes it out towards your mush.


Unboxed: Dyson Air Multiplier


The result is a 15x increase in windspeed between the effort the Dyson Air Multiplier puts in, and the result you get blasted across your desk.

There’s the fringe benefit that Dyson’s blade-free design pushes air towards you in a smooth, continuous stream too, rather than with the traditional thud-thud-thud of rotor-based air-pushers.

Add to this neat design touches, such as being able to pivot the Air Multiplier without it drooping, and the smooth automatic oscillation, and it’s far and away the best bit of office kit we’ve seen. Is it worth the pricey tag that comes attached to such innovative styling? It depends how hot you get at your desk, and what premium you place on clever design.

For us, the Dyson does its wind-shifting in a clever way that’s frankly better than the competition. Sure, it’s an investment, but great products that perform more than the sum of their parts allow are few between.

We’ve formed an emotional bond with Dyson’s bonkers blower, and that’s enough to part us with a few extra pounds, as well as making sure we’ll point it out to every colleague as they pass by.

  • Dan Davies

    There’s no mention of how loud it is compared with a typical rotary fan.

    • http://www.gravatar.com James Holland

      Sorry Dan, let me tell you! It’s got a variable speed control. Dyson calls it a “dimmer switch” which is exactly what it is – at the lowest setting, the Air Multiplier’s very quiet. More so than a traditional fan, but kicking out around the same breeze. You can turn it all the way up, when of course it gets louder, but I wouldn’t say it was any more noisy than a traditional desk going at full pelt – there’s also no creaking noise from the rotation, which you’d get from a traditional design.

  • Geoff

    It looks nice, but what I can’t believe is that Dyson are claiming this is new technology! It’s just a ringjet like the ones that have been used in industrial applications for years. Simply sticking a fan underneath and putting it on a desk doesn’t make it innovative. (See http://www.secomak.com/ring_jets.asp or http://www.beck-air.com/RingjetAirAmplifiers/tabid/66/RingjetAirAmplifiers/Applications/tabid/94/Default.aspx for the uninformed)

  • Captain Pugwash

    All I can say is that People must have more money than sense!!!

    I will concede that Dyson products are well engineered but is it worth that price tag, Me thinks not!!
    especially given they could shift more units by dropping the price then surely this would stamp out most of the air flow competitors then they could put the price up!!

    • http://www.gravatar.com James Holland

      I’m with you on the price, Captain. But there are plenty of retro-styled chrome fans that cost £150, and they’re nowhere near as smart, efficient or weird looking as the Air Multiplier… guess it comes down to taste as much as anything.

  • Paul Robins

    I’m sorry, but what fans do you use that deliver air in ‘thud thud’ lumps? Last time I checked, a fan rotated 360 degrees at a constant rate, moving air towards you in a stream.

    Sounds like someone’s trying to rationalize a fan which costs more than some computers. What a waste of cash, suck it up and buy a decent rotary fan instead.

    • http://www.electricpig.co.uk Ben Sillis

      Answer: very cheap ones like mine. I’d still take that and a spare £190, mind.

  • Bethan Ryder

    It does sound crazy, and the price is a lot, but just see one, they’re incredible. The safety aspect especially, anyone with a toddler will know how much they love to stick their fingers, they very very light, far quieter and easier to use. I’m just torn by the fact I love the film noir nostalgic look of a trad fan! Perhaps if it was £100 it would be more palatable, but check one out!

  • Trish

    I brought home my air multiplier yesterday – I must admit upfront I had not seen it in the flesh before buying, I’d purchased it over the phone during a sale and picked it up yesterday evening. On first impressions it looks fabulous, and I wanted a white one to disappear in front of my white walls, only to discover on opening that it has a dark grey cord which is pretty visible. It wasn’t a vain purchase, I genuinely wanted a fan, but five paces away from it I can feel no breeze at all – in other words, no cooling effect. Plus I was also expecting it to be whisper quiet – its just as noisy as any other fan, and quite noisy on the highest setting (which is what you’ll want it on). I was pretty disappointed and wanted to return it today only to find – once the box is opened and you’ve used it – you can’t. If you’re after the latest gadget – buy it. If you’re after a fan … there are vastly superior products on the market. And please go and test it out before purchase to ensure its giving you the cooling effect you want – silly of me not too but the reviews I’d read on the product were all so glowing.

  • squinkies

    Just wanted to say good work before i i forget.

  • pottinger

    Just wanted to say good work before i i forget.

  • BigBen

    Your mileage may vary, but for us this ‘Air Multiplier’ is a joke in bad taste at the expense of those who failed to pay attention in school.  The principle of induced flow was used by the ‘Jetex Augmenter Tube’ in the 1950s. My friend had one.   The Mercury Vapour Pump is a close cousin.  Diffusers on the rear of F1 cars are ‘curently ‘blown’ by the engine exhaust.  And so on.
    Using this principle to shift air for human cooling confers few net advantages to moving air any other way. 
    In our experience of the Dyson machine it delivers an annulus of moving air with some induced flow both inside and out.  Mostly inside, as you’d expect.
    Compared with an AU$18 fan with similar active area, it moves a lot less air!  Less than half the measured air speed with both at full chat.  Either the Dyson is lacking in power, or the efficiency is very poor. Maybe both.
    Yes, the fan flow is more turbulent.  Yes, the Dyson delivers a smooth flow.  But a quick-and-dirty focus group agreed that when adjusted for equal flow, the traditional fan cooled more effectively.
    As for being bladeless, whatis it that  moves the air inside the Dyson box? Ah! A tiny fan.
    Your mileage may indeed vary, you may love this Dyson. 
    Some people just love expensive shiny watches that are almost as good as an AU$30 Casio at keeping time.  I can’t stand wasted wonga, and this is another piece of ‘jewelery’ that is all about shiny appearance and gullible customers. .

    Dyson is a very clever man, his cyclone filtration in the vacuum cleaner was a very clever application of a well-known principle.  Implementation was less good, the cleaners are a bit fragile  and are easily defeated by a bottle-top of the wrong size. But the marketing was superb, and the success deserved. 

    This thing is just an overpriced (*seriously* overpriced) kitchen fan. If you’ve gone and bought one, I apologise for laughing at you in advance.

  • BigBen

    Your mileage may vary, but for us this ‘Air Multiplier’ is a joke in bad taste at the expense of those who failed to pay attention in school.  The principle of induced flow was used by the ‘Jetex Augmenter Tube’ in the 1950s. My friend had one.   The Mercury Vapour Pump is a close cousin.  Diffusers on the rear of F1 cars are ‘curently ‘blown’ by the engine exhaust.  And so on.
    Using this principle to shift air for human cooling confers few net advantages to moving air any other way. 
    In our experience of the Dyson machine it delivers an annulus of moving air with some induced flow both inside and out.  Mostly inside, as you’d expect.
    Compared with an AU$18 fan with similar active area, it moves a lot less air!  Less than half the measured air speed with both at full chat.  Either the Dyson is lacking in power, or the efficiency is very poor. Maybe both.
    Yes, the fan flow is more turbulent.  Yes, the Dyson delivers a smooth flow.  But a quick-and-dirty focus group agreed that when adjusted for equal flow, the traditional fan cooled more effectively.
    As for being bladeless, whatis it that  moves the air inside the Dyson box? Ah! A tiny fan.
    Your mileage may indeed vary, you may love this Dyson. 
    Some people just love expensive shiny watches that are almost as good as an AU$30 Casio at keeping time.  I can’t stand wasted wonga, and this is another piece of ‘jewelery’ that is all about shiny appearance and gullible customers. .

    Dyson is a very clever man, his cyclone filtration in the vacuum cleaner was a very clever application of a well-known principle.  Implementation was less good, the cleaners are a bit fragile  and are easily defeated by a bottle-top of the wrong size. But the marketing was superb, and the success deserved. 

    This thing is just an overpriced (*seriously* overpriced) kitchen fan. If you’ve gone and bought one, I apologise for laughing at you in advance.

  • BigBen

    Your mileage may vary, but for us this ‘Air Multiplier’ is a joke in bad taste at the expense of those who failed to pay attention in school.  The principle of induced flow was used by the ‘Jetex Augmenter Tube’ in the 1950s. My friend had one.   The Mercury Vapour Pump is a close cousin.  Diffusers on the rear of F1 cars are ‘curently ‘blown’ by the engine exhaust.  And so on.
    Using this principle to shift air for human cooling confers few net advantages to moving air any other way. 
    In our experience of the Dyson machine it delivers an annulus of moving air with some induced flow both inside and out.  Mostly inside, as you’d expect.
    Compared with an AU$18 fan with similar active area, it moves a lot less air!  Less than half the measured air speed with both at full chat.  Either the Dyson is lacking in power, or the efficiency is very poor. Maybe both.
    Yes, the fan flow is more turbulent.  Yes, the Dyson delivers a smooth flow.  But a quick-and-dirty focus group agreed that when adjusted for equal flow, the traditional fan cooled more effectively.
    As for being bladeless, whatis it that  moves the air inside the Dyson box? Ah! A tiny fan.
    Your mileage may indeed vary, you may love this Dyson. 
    Some people just love expensive shiny watches that are almost as good as an AU$30 Casio at keeping time.  I can’t stand wasted wonga, and this is another piece of ‘jewelery’ that is all about shiny appearance and gullible customers. .

    Dyson is a very clever man, his cyclone filtration in the vacuum cleaner was a very clever application of a well-known principle.  Implementation was less good, the cleaners are a bit fragile  and are easily defeated by a bottle-top of the wrong size. But the marketing was superb, and the success deserved. 

    This thing is just an overpriced (*seriously* overpriced) kitchen fan. If you’ve gone and bought one, I apologise for laughing at you in advance.

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